May 2023


Dear Friend,

Welcome to our Bridging  the Gap Mentoring  Newsletter.
Explaining how we help people through effective mentoring.


Good News 

We are very grateful to have received an individual donation of £200 to support Bridging the Gap Mentoring.  Donations are important to meet the costs of providing expert support for our mentors.They are also appreciated because they show our work is valued.


OPPORTUNITY

We are sorry that Yvonne, our outreach worker, will be leaving us and we are looking for someone to take over her work (part-time 10 hours/week).

If you know someone who might be interested please contact [email protected] or see our advert on Charity Jobs https://recruit.charityjob.co.uk/jobs/outreach-worker-(part-time-flexible)?Id=u3Rxv2h6nEeWfrlXwk1zqw


Homelessness and Mental Health 

It is not surprising that there is a link between mental health and homelessness.  People under stress are less likely to be able to manage bills, fill in computer forms and deal with all the practicalities of daily life.  If someone behaves in ways that seem strange or unusual, they are less likely to get help from the general public. Worrying about bills, rent or eviction is a major cause of stress and can exacerbate any mental  health issues.

66% or two thirds of the people helped by Bridging the Gap Mentoring in 2022 (16 people out of 24) had mental health symptoms.  Depression, self- harm and lack of self-care were the most common problems together with alcohol and drug problems.

Bridging the Gap Mentors are not equipped to deal with serious mental health problems.  But we will help people to access specialist services. We can provide practical support to people who are also in contact with mental health services.  If the mentee’s symptoms become too severe we will insist that they seek specialist help before mentoring continues

It is known that  past trauma, especially in childhood, can damage people’s ability to make constructive relationships.  Regular meetings with a mentor, especially a volunteer mentor who has chosen to take time to get to know you, can help to rebuild trust and the ability to relate to other people.  It creates a place where people can talk about problems.

Here are some comments from people we have helped:

“Mentoring has altered my perception of what it actually means when you have someone with the necessary skills to be compassionate, empathetic, able to evaluate another’s needs, and whom actually listens without any kind of urge to prejudge. “

“If you know there’s someone there to talk to, it can be really helpful.  Bridging the Gap really helped me to achieve some goals and have someone there to help me.”


 Supporting people 

Bridging the Gap Mentoring offers trained, expertly supervised volunteer mentors for people at risk of homelessness, offending and addiction.
Regular informal support from someone who is concerned about them individually helps people to rebuild their lives.

We are very grateful for the continuing interest and support of our volunteer mentors.
More information and advice for mentors is on our website here  https://bridging-mentoring.org.uk/advice-for-mentors/
Donations, of course, are always welcome  please donate  here https://bridging-mentoring.org.uk/donate/

To find out more or make a referral:

Visit our website: www.bridging-mentoring.org.uk
Freephone number: 0800 488 0746
Email us: welcome@bridging-mentoring.org.uk
When you contact us, we will ask for some further details whilst arranging a volunteer match.  We aim to start the partnership in 2-4 weeks.


We look forward to working with you.

Best wishes,Yvonne
Bridging the Gap Mentoring


Bridging the Gap Mentoring offers trained, expertly supervised volunteer mentors for people at risk of homelessness, offending and addiction. Regular support from someone who is concerned about them individually can help people to rebuild their lives.